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Alfred Hitchcock Classic Cinema Directing

Book Interview: The Camera Lies – Acting For Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock Master

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Publisher: Oxford University Press

Release Date: September 01, 2020

A Conversation with Dan Callahan

“Even when we know everything about a movie down to its shooting schedule and budget and technical tricks, we believe at some level that the magic trick is real. And of course nothing delighted Hitchcock more than explaining his tricks with the camera, his devices to make it lie. He wanted us to know it all and then still fall for it, and fall in love. Watch his films again, fall in love again, and know that we are falling in love with a mirage, with a lie.” –Dan Callahan (The Camera Lies, 2020)

Alfred Hitchcock is said to have once remarked, “Actors are cattle,” a line that has stuck in the public consciousness ever since. For Hitchcock, acting was a matter of contrast and counterpoint, valuing subtlety and understatement over flashiness. He felt that…

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"Making of" Directing Filmmakers

Book Review: My Best Friend’s Birthday – The Making of a Quentin Tarantino Film

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Publisher: BearManor Media

Release Date: October 06, 2019

My Best Friend’s Birthday: The Making of a Quentin Tarantino Film is a book that few expected. The film discussed wasn’t even completed, and most books on the director relegate this abandoned effort to a mere footnote. Andrew J. Rausch hopes to remedy this unfortunate tendency amongst Tarantino scholars. The writer interviewed a great many of those who worked on the project—including Tarantino himself—and presents these textual interview snippets in an order that traces how each of these people came together, other early film projects they worked on, and how they ended up making (or trying to make) a black-and-white screwball comedy. The final section of the book is a breakdown of the film as it would have been if it had been completed. He also makes the argument that My Best Friend’s Birthday is something far more meaningful than a curiosity. After all, the film’s production was a formative experience in Tarantino’s life. It helped shape his voice and prepared him for bigger and better projects. If the book has a weakness, it is that the “oral history” nature of the text results in a book that is sometimes slightly repetitive. However, one imagines that scholars and fans will be thrilled to have this information available to them as it offers a relatively detailed account of a part of Tarantino’s history that has been largely reduced to mere trivia until now.

Categories
Directing Editing Screenwriting

Book Review: Storytelling for Film and Television

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Publisher: Routledge

Release Date: May 01, 2019

Storytelling for Film and Television has been described as “a theory and practice book which offers a definitive introduction to the art of storytelling through writing, directing, and editing.” This is a fair enough description of Ken Dancyger’s text, although it is debatable as to whether it really “provides a comprehensive explanation of the tools that underpin successful narrative filmmaking and television production.” In fact, it seems very unlikely that a truly “comprehensive” examination of this particular subject will ever exist.

Dancyger attempts to explain how the three aforementioned phases of film and television production contribute to the storytelling process. He does this by using several very specific examples from films such as The Verdict, The Revenant, and Son of Saul and television series such as Breaking Bad and Game of Thrones. This approach is both the book’s greatest strength and its major weakness since one’s enjoyment and understanding will depend on whether they have seen the movies that are being used as case studies and that they enjoy (or at least appreciate) them.

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"Making of" Directing Filmmakers

Book Review: Quentin Tarantino — The Iconic Filmmaker and His Work

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Publisher: Quarto Press

Release Date: October 01, 2019

Those who have read Ian Nathan’s wonderful book about the Coen Brothers (The Coen Brothers: The Iconic Filmmaker’s and Their Work) will know what to expect on this even better book about Quentin Tarantino’s filmography. One could call it a career biography as it is a nice fusion of scholarly analysis and “behind the scenes” information. Tarantino fans will want to have this on their shelves as it makes for terrific bedtime reading, and film scholars will be happy to have it as a resource (especially since there aren’t that many books about Quentin’s work). The book covers each of the director’s nine primary films—including Once Upon A Time In Hollywood—as well as those he wrote but didn’t direct (True Romance, From Dusk Till Dawn, and Natural Born Killers). Honestly, I am going to keep an eye out for any future books written by Ian Nathan.

Contents

Reservoir Dogs - Spread

Kill Bill Volume One and Two - Spread

Categories
Classic Cinema Directing

Book Review: Steven Spielberg Interviews

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Publisher: University Press of Mississippi

Release Date: August 15, 2019

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Steven Spielberg began as an auteur wunderkind filmmaker, but developed into a successful Hollywood mogul. The interviews in this revised edition of Steven Spielberg Interviews—one in a series of texts from the ‘University Press of Mississippi’ entitled the Conversations with Filmmakers Series—covers much of his career as a filmmaker up to this point. The final interview in this collection was given during the publicity for Ready Player One while one of the earliest was given during a press tour for Sugarland Express.

The original edition (which was published in 2000) included 18 interviews that covered the span of his career up to that particular point in time. This revised edition includes 11 of those 18 interviews, omits 7 of them, and adds 9 new interviews so that the entirety of his career is covered. One wonders why they didn’t simply publish a second volume that covers the span of time between 2000 and 2019, but those who haven’t already invested in that earlier edition will certainly be happy that they didn’t (since they will not have to buy both volumes). We can’t completely agree with all of the editorial choices that were made while curating this new edition. An example would be their decision to omit an interview that covers The Color Purple while keeping the interview for Always. Whatever criticisms one might have about The Color Purple, the film was inarguably a milestone in Spielberg’s career. It was certainly more important and more successful than Always! However, few will lament the interview entitled “1941: Bombs Away” (even if an interview about Spielberg’s first failure has value).

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This is the cover used for the original edition that was published in 2000.

This list of the interviews contained in both editions may help those considering an upgrade. All interviews that are not in bold are unique to that particular edition.

List of Interviews – Original 2000 Edition:

At Sea with Steven Spielberg

Filming Sugarland Express: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Primal Scream: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Close Encounters with Steven Spielberg

The Mind Behind Close Encounters of the Third Kind

1941: Bombs Away

Steven Spielberg and His Adventures on Earth

A Conversation with Steven Spielberg

Spielberg Films The Color Purple

Spielberg at 40: The Man and the Child

Always: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Hook

Steven’s Choice

Seriously Spielberg

A “World” Apart

Five Star General

Crossroads: Steven Spielberg

Steven the Good

List of Interviews – Revised 2019 Edition:

At Sea with Steven Spielberg

Filming Sugarland Express: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Primal Scream: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Close Encounters with Steven Spielberg

The Mind Behind Close Encounters of the Third Kind

Steven Spielberg and His Adventures on Earth

Always: An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Steven’s Choice

Seriously Spielberg

A “World” Apart

Five Star General

An Interview with Steven Spielberg

Spiegel Interview with Tom Cruise and Steven Spielberg

A Telephone Call with Spielberg

Spiegel Interview with Steven Spielberg

Q&A: Steven Spielberg

Interview: Steven Spielberg Tempts the Fates with His Animated Tintin

Steven Spielberg Interview for Lincoln

Steven Spielberg on the Cold War and Other Hollywood Front Lines

Ready Player One’s Steven Spielberg and Ernest Cline on Pooling Their Nostalgia to Tell a New Story

One may question their decision to omit interviews from their original volume since the new edition is only 206 pages (if one doesn’t count the preface or the index). 7 extra interviews wouldn’t have made the book too long. In the end, this new edition is a valuable upgrade and is recommended for Spielberg fans. Those who do not already own the earlier text should opt for this version, and those who already have that text on their shelves may wish to upgrade. Just remember to hold on to that earlier edition for the interviews that haven’t been carried over.

Categories
Alfred Hitchcock Classic Cinema Directing Filmmakers

Book Interview: Hitchcock and the Censors

Alfred Hitchcock Master

Hitchcock and the Censors - Cover

Publisher: The University Press of Kentucky

Release Date: June 14, 2019

A Conversation with John Billheimer

John Billheimer has written a book that seems long overdue. In Hitchcock and the Censors, he “traces the forces that led to the Production Code and describes Hitchcock’s interactions with code officials on a film-by-film basis as he fought to protect his creations, bargaining with code reviewers, and sidestepping censorship to produce a lifetime of memorable films. By examining Hitchcock’s priorities in dealing with the censors, this work highlights the director’s theories of suspense as well as his magician-like touch when negotiating with code officials.”

Billheimer has graciously agreed to discuss both his book and Alfred Hitchcock’s battle with censorship in this exclusive interview.

Joseph Breen Joseph Breen headed the Production Code Administration until his failing health forced him to step down in 1954.

AHM: Would you tell us about your new book? How…

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Categories
Cinematography Directing Low Budget Filmmaking

Book Review: Film Directing, Shot For Shot & Cinematic Motion

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Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

Release Date: August 14, 1991

There aren’t very many books about film directing that can be described as “absolutely essential.” Steven D. Katz has written two such books, and Film Directing Shot by Shot: Visualizing from Concept to Screen is one of them. You would be hard pressed to find a film student or even a film director who isn’t familiar with the text. It’s the book that future filmmakers must read as a foundation to build upon.

Katz blends textual knowledge about shot composition, staging sequences, pre-visualization, depth of frame, and camera techniques with visual illustrations to make the concepts that he teaches clear and easy to understand. The result is a book that one might wish to read before each and every production in order to clear the cobwebs. One might even wish to use it a quick reference while visualizing your film and planning its shots during pre-production.

Over 750 storyboards and illustrations can be found throughout the book—including never before published storyboards from Steven Spielberg’s Empire of the Sun, Orson Welles’s Citizen Kane, and Alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds (although some or all of these have been published in other books since this book originally hit the shelves). This book would be a very good place for burgeoning filmmaker’s to begin their education, but it belongs on every filmmaker’s shelf no matter how deep their well of knowledge.

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Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

Release Date: May 15, 2004

This follow-up to Shot for Shot concentrates on various methods that directors use to create sequence shots and how to compose and choreograph scenes for the moving camera. Katz uses numerous diagrams and storyboard illustrations to communicate the various concepts that the book discusses. It’s a more focused book than Shot for Shot (which is more of an overview of the visualization process), and future filmmakers hoping to further develop their craft will certainly want to add this to their libraries.

Categories
Directing Screenwriting

Book Review: Cinematic Storytelling

 

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Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

Release Date: August 01, 2005

Cinematic Storytelling: The 100 Most Powerful Film Conventions Every Filmmaker Must Know isn’t exactly one-stop shopping when it comes to screenwriting, but it makes a nice supplement as it discusses conventions that are largely ignored by the structure-centric tomes that saturate the market. Jennifer Van Sijll instead focuses on various specific elements that are an important part of the language of cinema and in doing so leans into the director’s territory. However, in including script excerpts, the reader sees how such conventions are suggested by the screenwriter as photos illustrate her points.

Many of these will be familiar to most of those who are interested in filmmaking, but the book may still give these people a new way of seeing these conventions or at least serve as a refresher course (which can also be helpful). There are probably other books that go into these issues in more depth, but brevity might actually be a positive attribute for those who are simply looking to revitalize their memories or prod their imaginations. In any case, it is recommended for beginners.

Categories
Classic Cinema Directing Filmmakers

Book Interview: Halloween – The Changing Shape of an Iconic Series

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Publisher: CreateSpace

Release Date: October 20, 2018

A Conversation with Ernie Magnotta

Halloween: The Changing Shape of an Iconic Series meticulously examines John Carpenter’s original classic in an effort to determine the qualities that made the film an enduring classic. He then dissects each of the film’s sequels comparing their various elements to those in the original film to determine why these films never quite lived up to the original. As a result, the resulting text is an illuminating read that should be required reading for anyone who works on any of the following sequels from this point forward. It should literally be a contractual obligation. Fans of the series will also want to add it to their collections as the pages are packed with information and plenty of visual stimulation (there are over 200 full-color photos throughout the length of the book).

Ernie Magnotta (the book’s author) kindly agreed to give us his thoughts on the iconic Halloween series and fills us in on what can be expected from his new book.

CL: It is somewhat difficult to believe that a book about this immensely popular film series hadn’t been published before your book was released in October. There isn’t even a book about the making of the original film available. What gave you the idea for this comprehensive dissection of the series?

EM: In 2013, I was writing for a handful of retro film magazines and, one day, I made a list of ideas for future articles. I hate rehashing what has already been written/said, which is why I didn’t do a “making of the Halloween series” book. This material has been covered on all the DVD/Blu-ray releases. Comparing Halloween’s filmmaking techniques to those of the sequels seemed like something that hadn’t been done before. However, I quickly realized that this idea was too big for an article and would have to be done as a book. I felt qualified to write it because I’ve studied filmmaking at the School of Visual Arts in New York and have spent decades trying to figure out exactly what made that great film the classic that it is.

CL: Could you describe “Halloween: The Changing Shape of an Iconic Series” for our readers and what your intentions were in writing such a book?

EM: The book goes into great detail about each major filmmaking technique of the original Halloween—cinematography, direction & composition, story, characters music, suspense, theme, etc.—and then each sequel is given its own chapter where I discuss how these techniques were used incorrectly (as well as correctly) in order to show why the sequels have never been able to match the original film. In the concluding chapter, I talk about the elements that I believe would make a solid sequel to the original. Besides wanting to create an interesting read, I was honestly hoping that my book might help to make future sequels even better than the sequels we already have.

CL: What were the biggest challenges in making it a reality?

EM: There was just a lot of material to cover. I mean a lot. I knew it wouldn’t be a breeze, but I didn’t think it would take me five years to write. I had planned on releasing it no later than 2016, and actually thought I might have it out in 2015. (Laughs) Silly me.

CL: John Carpenter’s original Halloween is one of my favorite horror films and is unquestionably the ultimate film of its kind. What set this film apart from those that came before it?

EM: At the time of Halloween’s release, many horror films were either somewhat shoddy, low-budget jobs which were quickly forgotten by most or big-budget Hollywood films with major stars and stunning special effects like The Exorcist, Jaws, and The Omen.

Halloween proved that you didn’t need a large budget, big-name stars, or elaborate special effects to make an effective and beautiful-looking horror film. Amongst other things, the low budget wonder contained a simple, engaging premise, solid (but mostly unknown) actors, and an extremely talented writer/director familiar with the filmmaking techniques from the golden age of Hollywood.

CL: You mentioned before that the sequels never lived up to the original. Have any of them come close?

EM: In my opinion, the only sequel that comes close to the original film is 1981’s Halloween II. It has its problems, but it’s the closest in style and scares to the ’78 classic mainly due to most of the original cast and crew returning; especially cinematographer Dean Cundey and, of course, John Carpenter and Debra Hill. Director Rick Rosenthal’s mimicking of Carpenter’s directorial style also helps quite a bit.

CL: How does the Halloween series differ from other popular horror franchises?

EM: Although some of the sequels have their fair share of gore, the Halloween series is thought of, first and foremost, as films of suspense and scares unlike, say, the Friday the 13th series which has become synonymous with bloody special effects. I believe that suspense, fun scares, suggestion, and mood separate the series from other horror franchises that go for more in-your-face violence and gore.

CL: You decided not to include a chapter about Halloween III and chose instead to focus only on the films that focus on Michael Myers. What was your reasoning behind this choice and what are your thoughts and opinions about that film?

EM: The only things that Halloween and Halloween III share are their titles and that their stories take place on Halloween night. They are two completely different films, so it would make no sense to compare them. That being said, I love Halloween III. I think it’s a terrific film and that Tommy Lee Wallace did a superb job directing it. If it wasn’t for the title everyone would love this movie and it would be considered a classic today. I actually believe that it’s better than all the Myers sequels that followed it.

CL: It is interesting that the films in this particular franchise actually offers fans a choice of timelines (or continuing stories). What are your thoughts and preferences as to the various timelines offered?

EM: I don’t like that the series keeps starting over. It annoys me and I think that it annoys a lot of viewers. It’s no secret that I love the first two films. I liked Halloween 4, but they had complicated the simplicity of the original way too much by H6. H20 and Resurrection were a little too Hollywood/Dawson’s Creek for my tastes. I actually like Rob Zombie’s remake, but would have preferred that he had changed the names, locations, etc. and made that film as his own original slasher movie rather than as a Halloween remake.

CL: I actually had those very same thoughts about the Zombie remake, although I didn’t really love it as I’m not a fan of most of Rob Zombie’s work. Your annoyance with the various timelines makes me wonder what you thought of the recent sequel reboot by David Gordon Green. What did you think of the title? Did you enjoy the new score by John Carpenter, Cody Carpenter, and Daniel A. Davies? How does it differ from John Carpenter’s original classic?

EM: I was pretty excited about seeing this film, but I have to admit that I was let down. I expected a lot more from it. I would have preferred a different title. This wasn’t a remake. It was a sequel to the original film, so it shouldn’t have been titled Halloween. I did enjoy the score. I loved hearing the “Halloween Theme” as well as “The Shape Stalks.” My only complaint is that we didn’t get some of the other classic Carpenter themes from the original film; mainly “Laurie’s Theme.” The main way that the film differs from Carpenter’s original is that it wasn’t very scary. Carpenter’s Halloween was terrifying, and the new film had very few scares. Also, although the Shape went back to being a random killer and a force of evil, some of his other traits were either missing or were changed. For example, when he first arrives in Haddonfield he kills a few people in a matter of minutes. The Shape of the original film took his time and watched and played with his victims for quite a while before the kill.

CL: The title annoys me beyond words. I did think that Jamie Lee Curtis gave a wonderful performance, and this brings me to my next question. Which is your favorite of the slasher films that Jamie Lee Curtis starred in following Halloween (not counting Halloween II or H20)? Why do you prefer this one over the other?

That’s not an easy question to answer. I dearly love the original slasher cycle of the early 80s. Not counting Halloween and Halloween II, there are really only two slasher films which feature Jamie Lee; Prom Night and Terror Train. I don’t count The Fog or Road Games because, although both are excellent, they aren’t really slasher films. The Fog is a ghost story and Road Games is a Hitchcockian thriller. (By the way, if anyone reading this hasn’t seen Road Games, I highly recommend it.) Of the two, I’d have to pick Prom Night. I honestly don’t know the reason why, because I also love Terror Train. Maybe it’s the familiar school setting or the wonderful soundtrack (created in only a few days by Paul Zaza). It could be the killer’s eerie whispering voice which reminds me of Italian gialli films. Of course, there’s the always likable Jamie Lee. I don’t know the exact reason, but I seem to like Prom Night more than Terror Train. Not by much, though.

CL: You discussed Halloween II as the best sequel of the series. Are there any others that you admire more than the others? Which is your least favorite?

EM: After Halloween II, I consider Halloween 4 to be the best sequel involving Michael. Like H2, it has its problems, but director Dwight Little really tried to be respectful to the original and he succeeded quite a bit; most notably by going for pure suspense and scares over gore. Also, the writing was extremely solid; especially the characters of Jamie Lloyd and Rachel Carruthers. Danielle Harris and Ellie Cornell were excellent in these roles. And we have the return of the great Donald Pleasence as our beloved Dr. Sam Loomis.

My least favorite Halloween film would probably be Rob Zombie’s Halloween II. The reason for this is because it seems like the writer/director went out of his way to not make a Halloween film. Michael is barely in costume, Laurie and Loomis both die, there is no Halloween music (until the end credits), etc. Although extremely interesting, it’s also a very depressing film which, again, is the exact opposite of the fun original as well as the rest of the series.

CL: What do you think the future holds for the iconic series?

EM: That’s hard to say. I think a huge problem is that for the past twenty years the series has been distributed by major Hollywood studios Dimension and Miramax. These studios seem like they want to make each Halloween sequel a big budget blockbuster event mainly by having big name stars attached to them. In 1998, H20 ignored the previous three sequels in order to bring Jamie Lee Curtis back as Laurie Strode. The original film was remade in 2007 with superstar Rob Zombie directing.

None of the sequels are not supposed to exist in the newest film. [It] continues on from the classic original with John Carpenter as executive producer and Jamie Lee returning as Laurie once again. Although exciting, I think this is a mistake. The studios are concentrating too much on star power. They forget that even though the original Halloween became a phenomenon, it was still a low budget film with only Donald Pleasence as its “name” value. (Donald was certainly well-known, but he wasn’t a “hot” [and] “in demand” star in 1978.) A huge part of Halloween’s success came from intelligent and masterful filmmaking techniques.

I love Jamie Lee Curtis and Laurie Strode but I honestly think that the actress and the character should not appear in any more Halloween films, because there’s nowhere left to go with Laurie. To be honest, she shouldn’t have come back for the 2018 film. Think about it. Didn’t we pretty much see most of this twenty years earlier in H20? The only reason I am glad that Jamie/Laurie came back for the new sequel is that the character was much better written in this film than she was in H20. Jamie was excellent in the role (which is no big shock to anyone).

But to answer your question, I’m not sure what the future holds for the Halloween series. If it were up to me, I would concentrate less on hype [and] adding name stars and more on making an effectively scary film using the excellent filmmaking techniques of John Carpenter’s original.

Interview by: Devon Powell

Autographed copies of “Halloween: The Changing Shape of an Iconic Series” can be purchased at the book’s Official Website and normal copies are available on Amazon.

Categories
Cinematography Directing Filmmakers

Book Review: Shoot Like Tarantino

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Publisher: Michael Wiese Productions

Release Date: Aug 01, 2015

Christopher Kenworthy’s Shoot Like Tarantino: The Visual Secrets of Dangerous Storytelling is a strange animal. It is a book written and arranged for burgeoning filmmakers in an effort to help them learn from Tarantino’s camera techniques. Kenworthy does an admirable job at explaining his intentions in the book’s introduction, and they bear repeating here:

“…This book shows you why the best moments in [Tarantino’s] films work so well, and how you can take that knowledge to make your own films work more effectively.

You don’t want to copy Tarantino. Hundreds of people copy Tarantino without understanding what it is that makes him brilliant and the result is usually a lot of swearing and pointless violence. When people copy Tarantino badly, it makes for an embarrassing mess.

You want to be an exciting and original filmmaker, but when you learn the shots, shortcuts, and creative setups that Tarantino has mastered, you will become a better filmmaker. An understanding of how he works should give you more opportunities to be creative with the camera… The films explored in this book show that no matter how good your actors or your script, you need to explore the magic of the camera to make your story work on the big screen.

The scenes chosen for this book range from unforgettable masterpieces to more functional moments, to show that a good storyteller must make the most of the shot, whether it’s the best scene or one of the minor plot points…

…By the time you have reached the end of the book you should have a good grasp of how Tarantino sees a scene, how carefully he sets it up, and how he films creatively. You’ll be able to shoot your own scenes with a better understanding of the visual techniques that make a scene come to life.” -Christopher Kenworthy (Introduction, Shoot Like Tarantino, 2015)

It is good that Kenworthy makes it a point to discourage the reader from merely using the information in the book in an effort to copy the director’s methodology. The book is meant to illuminate the visual language of the cinema and how Quentin Tarantino is able to filter this language through his own voice. It is the language that the reader is intended to learn. The voice that this language is filtered through should absolutely be their own. It is a similar concept to how great painters once learned their craft by painting the works of the great masters that proceeded them. Only after learning their craft could they filter this through their own unique subjective voice to create art. Luckily, for anyone with innate talent, their material will automatically be filtered through their own unique perspective without any pretentious effort on their part—but they will need to learn and understand the language, and this book is an extremely fun way to do this (even if it doesn’t cover the entirety of this language).

For those learning film direction, this book is best used as a supplement to more in-depth texts. This point should absolutely be stressed, but there is another audience for this book. Fans of Quentin Tarantino may very well find that the book is a great resource when it comes to gaining an understanding into this unusual director’s working methods. The book was originally released in August 2015—a few months before Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight was released into theaters, so this film isn’t covered at all in the book’s pages. Death Proof is also noticeably absent—although, this is likely due to the fact that the film is considered to be his weakest effort. What’s more, none of the films discussed are covered in their entirety as such an approach would require several volumes!

Kenworthy merely takes a few scenes from Tarantino’s canon in order to illustrate various intentions or tasks (each of which is given its own chapter and covers a single scene or sequence): “Raising Tension” (Inglorious Basterds), “Subtle Conflict” (Jackie Brown), “Anticipation” (Inglorious Basterds), “Unbearable Tension” (Inglorious Basterds), “Minimal Cuts” (Django Unchained), “Impending Violence” (Django Unchained), “Deliberate Anti-climax” (Kill Bill, Vol. 1), “Breaking Normality (Pulp Fiction), “Controlling Space” (Pulp Fiction), “Group Conversation” (Kill Bill, Vol. 2), and “Losing Control” (Reservoir Dogs). Those who have read his three volume Master Shots series will have a general idea of the basic structure and presentation of the book.

Obviously, certain readers might disagree with some of Kenworthy’s comments as to the intentions and effects of Tarantino’s shooting choices, but this doesn’t ultimately matter. The important thing is that it forces the reader consider these shots and how they are used in Tarantino’s work. Shoot Like Tarantino: The Visual Secrets of Dangerous Storytelling is well worth reading for both Tarantino fans and anyone attempting to learn the craft of filmmaking.