Book Interview: The Essential Films of Ingrid Bergman

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Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

Release Date: September 15, 2018

It doesn’t matter what you’ve read or what you may have heard about the importance of Alfred Hitchcock’s collaboration with Grace Kelly. Ingrid Bergman’s place in the master’s legacy is every bit as important and possibly even more interesting. Needless to say, any book examining her work is worth reading for fans of the director as well as for those who admire this incredible actress.

In “The Essential Films of Ingrid Bergman,” Constantine Santas and James Wilson look at what they consider her most notable performances (and they had plenty to choose from). Her career began in Sweden in the 1930s and lasted until the year of her death in 1982, but this text focuses on the 21 films that they consider her most noteworthy. Special attention is paid to those aspects of her acting that made her stand…

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Book Interview: Hitchcock’s Heroines

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Publisher: Insight Editions

Release Date: May 01, 2018

A Conversation with Caroline Young

From his early days as a director in the 1920s to his heyday as the Master of Suspense, Alfred Hitchcock had a complicated and controversial relationship with his leading ladies. He supervised their hair, their makeup, their wardrobe, and pushed them to create his perfect vision onscreen. These women were often style icons in their own right, and the clothes that they wore imbued the films with contemporary glamor.

Quite a lot has been written over the past few decades regarding Alfred Hitchcock’s use of women in his films—some of it from a scholarly or theoretical standpoint and some of it from a sensationalized tabloid angle that only serves to muddy the waters of responsible scholarship. However, it must be said that this new Insight Editions release of Caroline Young’s Hitchcock’s Heroines doesn’t quite fall into either…

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Book Review: Close Encounters of the Third Kind – The Ultimate Visual History

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Publisher: Harper Design

Release Date: October 24, 2017

There are two kinds of coffee table books. The first category includes books that are quick cash-in products and have been built around a generous helping of still photography that includes the occasional quote or caption spread throughout the pages. If these books offer text, it is usually generalized fluff that offers very little in the way of actual information. Needless to say, these books are quite disappointing to the discerning reader.

The second category is quite different. These books offer much more to the discerning reader. The images mix organically with textual information in a way that creates a relationship between these two ingredients, and the result is incredibly informative and extremely entertaining. It is our pleasure to assure readers that Close Encounters of the Third Kind: The Ultimate Visual History belongs to this second category.

A Glipse Inside # 1

It is described by Harper design as a “fully authorized behind-the-scenes book exploring the creation, production, and legacy of this iconic film” and we feel that the book more than lives up to this description. Created in conjunction with Sony Pictures and Amblin Entertainment, it details the complete creative journey behind the making of the film and examines its cultural impact. The book features a wealth of rare and never-before-seen images from the archives—including on-set photography, concept art, storyboards, and even script pages in an effort to create a visual narrative of the film’s journey to the big screen. Interviews with some of the key contributors were utilized in an effort to create a first-hand commentary about the making of this film classic.

A Glimpse Inside # 2

Needless to say, we can wholeheartedly recommend this excellent book to anyone who has an affection for the film or Steven Spielberg.

Book Interview: Grace Kelly: Hollywood Dream Girl

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Publisher: Dey Street Books

Release Date: October 24, 2017

A Glimpse Inside #2

“Mr. Hitchcock taught me everything about cinema. It was thanks to him that I understood that murder scenes should be shot like love scenes and love scenes like murder scenes.” -Grace Kelly

The creative relationship between Grace Kelly and Alfred Hitchcock was one of the most mutually beneficial in the history of cinema. It’s nearly impossible to even discuss the director’s work without mentioning Grace Kelly’s name. However, she was so much more than the master’s temporary muse. No movie star of the 1950s was more beautiful, sophisticated, or glamorous than Grace Kelly. The epitome of elegance, the patrician young blonde from Philadelphia conquered Hollywood and won an Academy Award for Best Actress in just six years, then married a prince in a storybook royal wedding. Today, more than thirty years after her death, Grace Kelly remains an inspiring fashion icon. This…

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Book Review: Reconstructing Strangelove – Inside Stanley Kubrick’s ‘Nightmare Comedy’

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Publisher: Wallflower Press

Release Date: January 2017

Mick Broderick offers Kubrick scholars a rare glimpse into the creation of what may very well be the director’s most important film: Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb. The text makes use of Kubrick’s own production papers from the Stanley Kubrick Archives in order to dissect the film’s creative evolution as well as its legitimacy in terms of how accurate the film’s depiction of nuclear warfare policies actually were. Several popular myths about the film’s production are proven false even as others are confirmed. Broderick doesn’t try to document the film’s creation and the reader shouldn’t expect a comprehensive examination of the film’s creation. Instead, we are given a scholarly examination of how the film was shaped by the cold war environment, the scientists and world leaders who created that environment, and Kubrick’s creative collaborators. It earns an easy recommendation for fans of the director and for those who admire the film itself.

Review by: Devon Powell

Book Review: The Making of ‘The Wizard of Oz’

The Making of 'The Wizard of Oz'

Publisher: Chicago Review Press

Release Date: October 1, 2013

The question before us is as follows:

Is The Making of ‘The Wizard of Oza good book or a bad book?

Aljean Harmetz’s seminal text about the production of MGM’s 1939 classic trumps all of the Oz texts that followed it, and this 75th Anniversary edition of the book gives fans of the film a good opportunity to visit this text if they haven’t already indulged. This compressive history of the production is superior even to the various documentaries on the subject (it covers more territory).

These pages go beyond the film to discuss the climate and methods of studio filmmaking (particularly at MGM). It goes a long way to dispel a lot of untrue myths that surrounded the production, and should exponentially enhance one’s enjoyment of the film. Other books may provide a larger array of stills and production images, but no amount of eye candy can replace the research that went into this book. It receives a most enthusiastic recommendation.

Review by: Devon Powell

Book Review: Chainsaw Confidential

Chainsaw Confidential

Publisher: Chronicle Books

Release Date: September 24, 2013

Gunnar Hansen has written an incredibly lucid text on the making of one of cinema’s most beloved (and hated) horror films. Chainsaw Confidential: How We Made the World’s Most Notorious Horror Movie chronicles the story of how the original 1974 version of ‘The Texas Chainsaw Massacre’ was created and the impact that it had on future horror films. Better yet, fans will learn the story from one of the film’s most instrumental actors. Yes, Gunnar Hansen is the man that portrayed “Leatherface.” However, we are not limited to his personal perspective. Hansen has seen fit to conduct interviews with other members of the cast and crew, and he has put these interviews to excellent use.

It must be said that the book is an enjoyable and interesting reading experience. Horror fans that have not yet read the book should remedy this immediately.

Review by: Devon Powell